July 2011
13

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Access Restored to Hulme Peak/Topaz Tower

for Hulme Peak/Topaz Tower

written by Doug Brown

The climbing community has now been granted access to the alpine routes on Hulme/Topaz via Topaz Creek FSR across Darkwoods land. With considerable assistance from the KMC and Hamish Mutch, we have been granted free and unfettered access up Topaz Creek from when the snow is gone until the end of August each year (when non-motorized hunting starts, and the gate will be locked). The only condition is that you must get a permit from Darkwoods before driving Topaz Creek. A permit is issued for one summer season, so you only need to get one a year.

Currently, the new permitting process is not setup, so until July 18, 2011 you can drive the Topaz road without a permit. After that you will need a permit. Please get one before going: will establish usage by climbers, and failure to do so will risk closure of the road permanently.

The process to get a permit is:

1. Call Darkwoods (Jennifer) at 250-825-4343 and request a permit for Topaz Creek. If she does not answer, you may leave a message requesting a permit - request the permit to be sent my fax or email. You may also request a permit by emailing darkgreen@shaw.ca.

2. Once you have the permit, fill it out, and fax it to Darkwoods or scan/photograph it email it to Jennifer at darkgreen@shaw.ca.

3. You must carry the permit on your person whenever you are in Darkwoods.

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Bugaboos Update

for Bugaboo Provincial Park

written by Peter Winter

Forwarded from Tay Hanson: You can now get past the avalanche debris to the parking lot (thanks to industrious shovellers).You do encounter snow around the 2000m mark (below the hut), but travel on the glaciers is easy and a lot of objectives are in. Anything steep or south facing is mostly dry (with snow on ledges), Kain and Pigeon are snowy but Kain has been done.Howsers are still pretty wintery but other than that you can climb more routes than not, and probably just encounter snow on the summits.In summary, its goldanged beautiful up there with hardly anyone around!Let it begin. Tay Hanson
Sr Ranger Columbia Area
Ministry of Environment
Office 250.489.8584
Cell 250.417.6955

June 2011
30

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Gondola Proposal

for Squamish

written by Jeremy Frimer

A new proposal for a gondola in Squamish was announced yesterday. The proposed gondola would launch from the gravel pit nestled between the Chief and Shannon Provincial Parks, ascend through BC Parks, and top out at a forested shoulder west of Mt. Habrich. Information about the proposal is available at http://www.seatoskygondola.com/

Representatives from CASBC and Squamish Access Society (SAS) recently met with developer David Greenfield (GroundEffects Development Inc.; www.grndfx.ca) to learn more about the proposal. The developer is seeking support from the various interest groups (including CASBC) before deciding whether to move forward.

The gondola would have a number of implications for Squamish residents, the local economy, tourists, climbers, backcountry skiers and other interested groups. CASBC has yet to take a position on the proposal. The CASBC Board is interested in members' views. We are exploring the proposal thoroughly and will be meeting with the developer again in the coming weeks or months.

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Lantzville Foothills Trails

for The Steppes

written by Eric Goodwin

It seems that the Lantzville foothill trails are opening back up to the public after the new landowner closed them last year. If we get any more concrete news we'll let you know.

"The fence and gate at the Harwood entrance were removed. Presumably if the new owners wanted to continue to keep people out they wouldn't have removed the barriers and signs. Also the Vipond access gate has a sign stating hiking and biking are allowed." via. ryanguy on islandclimbing.com

Birds of Prey, block gone

for Squamish

written by Jeremy Frimer

Regarding the loose block on Birds of Prey, the route is all clear. On Sunday morning, a team of Squamish climbers safely trundled a 4m x 4m flake, which had been sitting precariously atop the 2nd pitch of Birds of Prey. The block seemed to have wiggled loose and was resting gingerly on a straining tree. With a look-out on the ground and danger signs and flagging tape blocking the trails, the climbers trundled the block with minimal effort. The falling block took with it the supporting tree. All debris on the pitches below was removed. And bolts on climbs below were inspected and replaced where damage had occurred. The event was captured on video, which will be released soon.

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